Jump to content

Recommended Posts

17 hours ago, D.R.H. said:

WOW!!  Work on this level is hard for me to comprehend, however, I have to replace some panels on my Weasel. The flat ones are pretty straight forward and easy for me, the hard ones are the front and rear bottom panels that have the radii. Would I be able to talk you into cutting out one of each for me please? I will pay you for them, naturally. Thanks Dave.

Thank you. The front panel that I replaced I didn't use any fancy high tech tools to bent it. I bent it around a pipe to rough it in and fine tuned it over my knee to get it to fit properly. It's only 1,25 mm steel so it's not too hard to bend. 

I'm not sure if it will be cost effective for my to cut those panels for you considering I'm in Norway/Sweden. Shipping something of that size is not cheap. I can provide you with the drawing of the front panel piece if you like.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, M29 said:

Hi Alexander

The engine repair you did sounds like the same I will have to do on my T15 engine. I know the valves are all stuck and no1 cylinder is pitted. so a bore will be needed plus crank has some corrosion spots so that will have to be done as well. The dilemma I am having is I have a better engine from an M29C but it would not be the original. I wonder if the weasel gods would condemn me if I used the other block. I know I would still want to go through it as well so basically would save the bore  and crank grind work. I am really thinking that staying as original as possible is the best though. 

Dan

If I where you I would restore the original engine. It keeps it original and increases it's value.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Alexander. Yes please, a drawing would be perfect. I can take it to my sheet metal guy and he can cut it out with his plasma cutter. I can also pay for the postage to the U.S. through PayPal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I reached a milestone on my weasel last week when I finished the last of the major sheet metal jobs, so now the hull is complete, just the rest to go. 

I was thinking about replacing the front top panel, but after seeing Patrick's work on his T24 i decided that I would try straightening it instead.

IMG_6988.thumb.JPG.8bfc90cf9c8123a34adac6fafca14eee.JPG 

IMG_6989.thumb.JPG.1ff4447b117e497b395914af48ac6800.JPG

The panel was quite distorted, especially around the fuel filler opening which had been welded shut. I had to remove the reinforcement ring and straighten it first before I could work on panel itself. After an hour or two with the hammer and dolly, oxy/acetylene and shrinking disc I got the panel fairly straight, but I will have to do some lead work to get it where I want it. That will happen after I have sandblasted the whole hull. 

This was the first time I actually tried straightening a big panel like this, and I could only get it to the point where I could still feel some slight waves in the panel. Any further shrinking did not seam to help getting them to flatten out. I also tired stretching and then re shrinking but it did not help either, I only ended up at the same slight waves I started with. Being in uncharted territory I did not want to beat the panel too much, making it thinner, so I stopped there. Anybody got any tips and tricks on how to get it completely flat?

Anyhow the last pieces to "complete" hull was then installed.

IMG_6986.thumb.JPG.7d0078838d1bf446403b781c3b1af549.JPG  

A big thanks to John for supplying me with the coaming all those years ago. I now finally got to use it.

IMG_6991.thumb.JPG.4fbbe53b996def4a11d78a150320737e.JPG

IMG_6992.thumb.JPG.f7b948992ddda7427933443274cc42fa.JPG

Now it's just all the little jobs left. Grinding weld, straightening the odd dent, welding up unwanted holes, re drilling holes that should be there, well the list is quite long..... 

IMG_6990.JPG

Edited by M29C3284

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

After spending a half a day grinding welds I decided I needed to do something else, so I tackle one of does small projects. I only had one good top bow corner pocket so I decided I would try and make one. 

IMG_6993.thumb.JPG.3a0aab3d6d0bdaa1c566e0cd0d4bcea6.JPG

This was really a good job for the Pullmax. We picked up this P9 a few years ago for next to nothing. The steel it's made off costs more.

For those that don't know what a Pullmax is used for, it is used for either cutting or forming. In the case of the P9 model it can cut up to 10 mm mild steel and form up to 6 mm mild steel. It uses a reciprocating upper die and a stationary lower one to form or cut.   

IMG_6996.thumb.JPG.0cfa5ade9f65aa51b5faf246f89bc931.JPG

What make a Pullmax so versatile is that you can make your own dies and form almost any shape. The dies I'm using for this project are plasma cut from 6 mm steel.

IMG_6997.thumb.JPG.fa929b1496457c6516213638b83b9cc2.JPG

Then it's just a matter of running your material, in this case 2 mm steel, thru the dies while progressively lowering the top die until you have the shape you want.

IMG_6998.thumb.JPG.f881535dcb5f81da134c9bf08d70d2eb.JPG

This is the shaped piece. I always use a bigger piece then the final part, as there will always be some errors at the start. 

IMG_7000.thumb.JPG.1f249e9221a26c1c9da620513ebeb2e7.JPG 

Finished part after cutting to size, drilling holes and bottom cap installed. I plunge milled the 5/16" holes with a endmill because a regular drill would not track straight.

IMG_7001.thumb.JPG.9bf153e91a7e92669c840972c8b7ce1d.JPG

IMG_7002.thumb.JPG.064abef8ab0ef0c741c958ca264b9ad0.JPG

Reproduction part next to usable original part.

Edited by M29C3284
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Inspiration work. Well done👍👍 The standard of restoration workmanship that weasel owners aspire to nowadays is truly astounding. Keep the updates coming.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, M29C3284 said:

Anybody got any tips and tricks on how to get it completely flat?

 

Looking great.  Love the work with the Pullmax - those corner pockets look awesome!

I know the feeling really well of getting a panel really close and then it seems to stop.  First step is to hang up the tools for the night and come back a day later.

As I am no guru, your mileage may vary but here is how I understand what is happening.  The panel can't go flat again until it is.  I know that sounds silly, but hang with me.  Shrinking alone will not get it perfectly flat - you will have to planish further.

I find that I get the best results with a slapper.

1.  Cover the entire area with your Dykem/Sharpie so you can see what is happening.

2.  Where you can see that you have a wave - planish the whole area with the slapper until you get a nice oil canning effect - pops in and out.  If there are any small ridges/bumps - you need to get them out now.  Use a body hammer/dolly if you need to direct the force into a small area.  I have a body hammer with a flat pointed edge - almost like a wide thick screwdriver (don't know the proper name) - it works great for this kind of work because it doesn't tend to mar the metal surface. 

3.  Be ready to experiment with on/off dolly techniques.  It often helps to put a heavy dolly in the center of your bump and then hammer on the "edge of the crater" with a slapper or a body hammer (carefully).  It often doesn't seem like much is happening, but we are only trying to move the metal a little bit so that is somewhat to be expected.

4.  Once the area feels totally smooth but rounded (gentle oil canning bump), shrink with the disc.  I find it works best to shrink on the protruding side.  If you have access issues, hit the protruding side with a big dolly (yep - caveman metalworking) - until it pops out on the side you have access to shrink.  If you go easy on the pressure with the shrinking disc in the beginng, the area with tighten up as the heat causes it to expand and you will be able to shrink it more aggressively without it "popping back".  I know it sounds funny, but when you get to this stage, you are really close....

You can move the metal faster with the torch, but don't get it hot or you will cause localized waves that you will have to remove with a hammer and dolly.  At this point I just heat until the steel begins to turn color and then cool.

I think the hardest part about this straightening is having the conviction to continue.  I find myself getting it really close and thinking - "good enough" but.... because I am scared to make a decent job worse.  I think the operating idea is to be bold here...you have gotten it this close and you can get it totally flat if you just go a little further.

Again - great work and thanks for taking the time to share your process!

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Thanks Patrick, that is some great advice. I will have to try a slapper as I think I'm stretching instead of planishing with just the hammer. The off dolly technique is one that I really like. I have been playing around with who tight up against the metal I'm holding the dolly. Holding it with a small air gap really works well for me when I don't want to stretch the metal to much.

I guess I will just have to keep working at it.

Edited by M29C3284

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...