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M29 WW2 Olive Drab Color


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hi Everyone

Does anyone know the proper olive drab color the weasel was painted when out of factory. Is there a known paint formula or code  that my local auto paint supplier could use to mix it. Any information is appreciated. I have heard is was lusterless olive drab and see it available online, but don't like the idea of buying it online if my local supplier can mix it.

Dan

Dan

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Dan, I am not an authority on what shade of OD paint a weasel rolled off the production line with but here are some happy snaps of the Gillespie version of OD. There may be a paint code on the can that your paint store can use?????

IMG_1003.JPG

IMG_1000.JPG

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I have no knowledge of the Weasel paint specs but just got through doing this with my 1943 Willys MB.  I am going to paint my T24 white/camo and will have to do this work to figure out what is correct.

I spent a fair amount of time testing all of the various paints out there while doing my MB.  I ended up using a PPG product and having the color matched off of a NOS seat.  It came out great to my eyes.  Correct?  More in a second.

The Gillespie is a nice product although I don't think the color or level of "lusterless" is correct for a WW2 jeep/vehicle.  It is too light/tan and a little shiny for my eyes. The TM9 products (now sold by Midwest) are pretty good.  I know Paul Viens - who developed the product and then sold the company to Midwest - and he did a lot of work to try and match color and degree of luster while making a durable product.  For an off the shelf product, I would probably go with TM9.  Paulo Batisti also makes paint that is sold by Peter Debella here in the states.  It looks good but I have not really played with it.

Jim Gilmore has original paint chips and paper from WW2. He also has some NOS WW2 paint.  He opened a paint can with 319 and made up some test strips.  The NOS paint matched the WW2 paint chips.  The TM9 was the closest color match of the commercially available options.

I took a bumperette and we compared against Jim's originals and TM9.  You can see below.  The left paint is the original WW2 319.  The right is TM9.  My bumperette is visible through the "windows".   It is close but would need a little more brown in it to match the WW2 319.  IMG_4306.thumb.jpg.b38a1571fa96823054780b9aa7d45098.jpg

The last consideration is wear.  My jeep was finished in September and is quickly getting lots of patina.  The paint is very flat and shows every mark.  My jeep is already starting to look like a "vet".   The paint is not super durable - which is why I think most of the vendors end up more down the semi-gloss road.  I did use hardener in my paint and it sprays beautifully.  My local PPG pro auto shop mixed it up - and they have the formula so I am happy to pass it on.  It is much more expensive than the TM9 - probably $200 a gallon with reducer and hardener, but that is typical/inexpensive for "pro" paints these days.

I am planning to have the Weasel epoxy primed rather than using a traditional red oxide primer.  I want the best underlying protection given that I might swim this thing at some point.  We shall see. 

Final product:

IMG_4421.thumb.jpg.7eb84ec52490ffa6886028b54eccf3a8.jpg

 

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That jeep looks really nice Pat I watched all your videos as you rebuilt it. I saw the paint product John pictured online but would like to see a color sample. Your jeep Pat looks similar to the color of the early layer of paint on my weasel. The color on the long lost floater weasel post is the original color although faded. I really don't like the looks of that shade looks sort of yellow brown to me. I am not going to have everything correct on my weasels I know that but will strive for close compromises. Epoxy paint is great. If you plan on water use of the weasel maybe sealing under or at least around the edge of the hat channel flanges with 3M 5200 sealant to keep water and moisture out of the inside of those hat channels would be a good idea. It would be time consuming to do a nice job of sealing them all but would go along way to prevent any future rust especially hidden rust. The beauty of 3M 5200 is it cleans up and smooths out nicely with acetone so almost is invisible. I know on my floater weasel I will do this to all my seams and anywhere a bolt is installed as well. Put  it on the threads before install. Where the tanks bolt up to the main body  and between the flange would be a prime place to seal. Anyway just some thoughts.

Dan 

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Only reason I pointed to 3M 5200 is that I personally use it a lot as I am in the marine industry;  It is used extensively here in my area in the boat yards. Sika Flex is another popular manufacturer of sealing products here as well. I am not saying anything negative about other products though just what I am personally familiar with and have used  . A few points about 5200 is it is paintable,  cleans and fairs nicely with acetone and can even dry under water.without waiting for it to cure.  it is really great stuff. I prefer to use the fast cure version.

The main point I was trying to make in my earlier post was sealing of the hat channels and seams on the weasel body that are exposed to water. It seems like the Achilles heel of the weasel is to have all the  water and dirt collecting under them which over time  leads to rust. I was thinking today about all the years I have had my 1st weasel (bought it in 1975 Sam Wiener Motors New York)) and how many times I jumped in it with snow all over my boots (Alaska) which then melted and became a watery puddle  with no where to drain to but under the hat channels. Then I didn't care so much now 40 years later I see the damage done and want to improve my weasel by using modern products and techniques with out compromising to much originality The weasel when designed was never thought to have a life expectancy of so many years. I might even go so far after replacing the hat channels and some floor plate to rhino line the floor pan. This would make it virtually impervious to water damage. 

Dan

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