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M29C waterpump issues


Pips_Blaauw
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Greetings everyone!

Recently ive been restoring my weasel to its best potential... this means i also took out and cleaned the radiator. Since cooling is very important on these vehicles.... On closer inspection, the water pump seemed to leak. At first, i fitted new paper gaskets in combination with sealant. This, however did not fix the issue. After a while, I noticed the inside of the pully on the waterpump was wet. Does this mean the outer seal of the pump shaft is bad? The bearings sound and feel good... I immediately bought the available parts of the waterpump on ebay, but now the question is: does anyone have experience with the refurbishment of the pump? and if so, do you have any tips on how to do it? hope its a doable fix.... 

Regards,

Rob from the Netherlands! 

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Greetings Rob:

Sounds like the seals and/or bearing are failing.  This is a video I made for the WW2 jeep water pump.  The Weasel water pump rebuild is exactly the same process and steps.   Don't forget to install the one bolt in the Weasel pump before you press on the pulley.

 

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@Pips_BlaauwHave a look at my photos below on how I had to rebuild my Water pump. Not withstanding Patrick's great video, this might give some thoughts and ideas on how to rebuild your pump. The stainless steel collar was an interderence fit into the pump housing. The epoxy adhesive was just for added security.

Water pump.JPG

Water pump 001.jpg

Water pump 005.jpg

Water pump 008.jpg

Water pump 010.jpg

Water pump 013.jpg

Water pump 021.jpg

Water pump Resize 1.jpg

Water pump Resize 2.jpg

Water pumps Epoxy applied.jpg

Water pumps 003.jpg

Water pumps 008.jpg

Water pumps 009.jpg

Water pumps Chinese generic water pump bearing machined and fitted.jpg

Water pumps Seal insert pressed into position.jpg

Edited by OZM29C
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Great solution John, as always.  You probably saw that back in the day they made a special cutting tool for cleaning up the sealing face.  It is shown in TM 9-1772.  So far, i have rebuilt two Weasel water pumps and both were in nice shape...just a little 3m pad to polish them up.  Given how hard it is to find one, though, this is a great way to fix one with a pitted surface.

Cheers!

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3 hours ago, Patrick Tipton said:

Great solution John, as always.  You probably saw that back in the day they made a special cutting tool for cleaning up the sealing face.  It is shown in TM 9-1772.  So far, i have rebuilt two Weasel water pumps and both were in nice shape...just a little 3m pad to polish them up.  Given how hard it is to find one, though, this is a great way to fix one with a pitted surface.

Cheers!

Yes @Patrick Tipton Patrick, as you can see in the before photo above, the old seal surface was certainly beyond redemption. Having rebuilt many Jeep water pumps this way, it was just a matter of adapting my technique to a Weasel water pump. I don't expect a lot of guys would have access to machining equipment that I have but if they were to print off the photos and take them to their local machine shop, I am sure that the machine shop could do the job for them. BTW the collar is made from 316 Stainless Steel. I also had to machine to size  a generic ( I hate to admit it) Chinese made water pump bearing. See info below. Water pump bearing.pdf So far so good with the bearing but I don't think 16 miles on the weasel is a good reliability test as yet. The hardest part to find was the little retaining clip. Luckily a fellow in the UK gave me one but again I suspect that the clip would be a common Studebaker general part.

Water_pump_integral_shaft_bearings.pdf

Water pump bearing.pdf

Edited by OZM29C
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Thanks!!! @Patrick Tipton @OZM29C


Your tips and remarks are certainly very helpful for me! I do not have access to such metal working machines... but since I will receive a NOS bearing shaft, I am hoping I can "just" use a press to force it out. And then press the new one in place... I am still thinking if I should do this myself, or let a company with some experience do it. Seems like a normal job for you guys 🙂 I am eager to try it out... also a special thanks to the technical drawings! The time you spent on them is paid out tenfold! I will provide updates as soon as I have them... I'll let off the water (for the 5th time in 2 weeks) with the new rubber hoses I installed... The original tubing was completely plugged... The hoses make life a lot easier! 

 

Regards, Rob

ps: updates on the glueing of the rubber blocks on the tracks will come soon!  

 

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8 hours ago, OZM29C said:

 I also had to machine to size  a generic ( I hate to admit it) Chinese made water pump bearing. See info below.

 The hardest part to find was the little retaining clip. Luckily a fellow in the UK gave me one but again I suspect that the clip would be a common Studebaker general part.

@OZM29C Totally agree - most guys don't have a mill so repairing the surface like you did is next to impossible.  But, if the surface is bad, this is a great fix, even if you have to find a machinist to do the work.  These water pumps are getting scarce everywhere, so you have to make them work..

As for shafts, seals and parts, the rebuild kit is the same as several later truck water pumps that are widely available here.  PM me for a part number.

@Pips_Blaauw If you have a press, this is easy - just a little scary the first time out of concern for the housing.  Once you get it apart, check the seal surface and go from there.  If the surface is just a little ugly, you can use sandpaper to polish a little...you just need to keep the sealing surface flat and square so if it needs more than a little, better off heading to a machine shop and have them clean the surface up or do John's repair.

Patrick

 

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