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Bloody Rats! I started a job I have been putting off for years, the inpection of my final drive. After splitting the case I discovered that a family of rats had built a nest inside. I will have to now strip the final drive down to its individual parts in order to clean it. On the plus side my brake drums and bands are in perfect condition.

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The instrument panel does not reflect the costs required to restore it. NOS pust to start switch, NOS Ignition switch New repo water temp gauge, New repo panel light switch, NOS fuel primer, NOS rotary light switch, Speedometer overhaul and repairs to the gauge mounts.

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Same goes for the windscreen, New Glass, NOS U rubber for the glass, one NOS wiper motos, both wiper motors repaired, sandblasting and painting of the frame plus the time and costa involved in finding the jewellery (wiper cranks, wiper blades and arms, wiper short and long connecting  links)

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The weasel restoration show rolls on. I am bead blasting and etch priming the drive wheels that attach to the rear drive sprockets .

This is #3 of 4 wheels. Once the wheels are in OD paint I can assemble the drive sprockets and then put another tick in the box.

If you look carefully at the wheels you can see that I have previously removed the inner reinforcing plate and re-purposed that plate as a guide to help feed the track guides into the LAR drive sprockets. Happy snaps attached.

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Hub/sprockets were assembled this weekend. Really time consuming job. I used Cone lock nuts on the countersink head bolts to hold the assembly together. Cone lock nuts are an interference fit onto the bolt but a less likely to work loose when compared to other fasteners. I have loose assembled the idler arm spring to the idler arm but before I go further, can anyone shed some light on the correct orientation of the spring to the arm?

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Next task was to fit the sprockets onto the hub. Took a little bit of extra fitting work as the inned guide plate had moved when I tightened up the outer fasteners. I used grade 8 High tensile bolts and high nuts as per the OEM to fasten the assembly together. I also fitted the 45 angle grease nipple as recommended by @Bill Wolf

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Next task was to mount the newly assembled sprokets onto the final drive carrier. I finally got to use my hub seal installation tool (painted red in the photo)  that I made years ago. I also used the Caterpillar seals and @Gszechy excellent weasel washer kit that he makes. https://www.garysbunker.com/shop/m29-parts/thrust-lock-dust-shield-kit/

A worthy investment.

 

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Another big day on my weasel restoration. First task was painting. I painted the inner side of the rear float tank and also the areas where fittings bolt onto the tank. Also painted my NOS exhaust screen, and Capstan winch and touched up the front idler arms and springs.

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Next on the list was to fit the stretcher pockets and rudder support brackets. I temporarily mounted my NOS rudders so that I could adjust the rudder stops. Note the offset angle on the outer strecher pocket. I thought that the holes had been drilled incorrectly but when I checked the other rear float tank that I have here, it was exactly the same. Is there a reason why????? The other unusual observation I made is that the inner stretcher pocket is larger in overall size as compared to the outer.

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Just finished another weasel job, the restoration of the radiator air deflector panel. This is one of those obscure parts that is generally missing from a weasel. I managed to save the original felt. After blasting, filling in the extra hole, then some OD paint I replaced the felt using facsimile staples made from 1.6mm  316 Stainless TIG welder wire.  Another tick in the box.

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Now the large air deflector is done, its time to turn my attention to the two smaller low mounted air deflectors. I purchased a pair of NOS air deflectors many years ago and unfortunately the    fibre material is so brittle, it almost crumbles when touched. I have made a drawing to print out full size and I will cut the replacements out of felt. 

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Weasel Air deflector.pdf

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